22 April 2020   

3 min read
Laughter is our most basic emotional responses, but we aren’t taught to laugh or even smile; they’re as natural to us as breathing.

Laughter is clinically proven to have a powerful and positive effect on wellbeing. It heals and renews the human body and mind, and nothing works faster or more dependably to bring the mind and body back in to balance. Happily, there is growing interest in laughter as a simple and effective health and wellbeing strategy, although it’s still a much underutilised health and wellbeing resource.

A Japanese scientist geneticist, Kazuo Murakami used laughter to trigger energy inside a person’s DNA, potentially helping to cure a disease. Murakami has teamed up on the study with an unlikely research partner: stand-up comedians, who he hopes can turn their one-liners into efficient, low-cost medical treatment.

Genes are usually regarded as immutable, but in reality, more than 90% of them are dormant or less active in producing protein, so some types of stimulation can wake them up. Murakami’s tentative theory is that laughter is one such stimulant, which can trigger energy inside a person’s DNA potentially helping cure disease.

“A laughing therapy has no side-effects, meaning it’s an epoch-making treatment for clinical medicine,” Murakami said. “One day it won’t be a joke to see patients receive a prescription for a comedy video at a pharmacy for medical treatment,” he added.


Laughter is clinically proven to have a powerful and positive effect on wellbeing. It heals and renews the human body and mind, and nothing works faster or more dependably to bring the mind and body back in to balance. Happily, there is growing interest in laughter as a simple and effective health and wellbeing strategy, although it’s still a much underutilised health and wellbeing resource.

A Japanese scientist geneticist, Kazuo Murakami used laughter to trigger energy inside a person’s DNA, potentially helping to cure a disease. Murakami has teamed up on the study with an unlikely research partner: stand-up comedians, who he hopes can turn their one-liners into efficient, low-cost medical treatment.

Genes are usually regarded as immutable, but in reality, more than 90% of them are dormant or less active in producing protein, so some types of stimulation can wake them up. Murakami’s tentative theory is that laughter is one such stimulant, which can trigger energy inside a person’s DNA potentially helping cure disease.

“A laughing therapy has no side-effects, meaning it’s an epoch-making treatment for clinical medicine,” Murakami said. “One day it won’t be a joke to see patients receive a prescription for a comedy video at a pharmacy for medical treatment,” he added.