21 September 2018   

2 min read
Case study

Stockland and the National Theatre for Children (NTC) joined forces for the third consecutive year to present a first-of-its-kind program using LEGO® Education robotics, as part of a new learning experience for students. The ‘Bee on the Team’ (BOTT) program offers primary school students hands-on, in-class STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics) education experiences combined with LEGO® Education robotics

Through our sponsorship, 11,855 students across 24 primary schools in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast and Perth took part in the hands-on STEAM enrichment education opportunity.

The BOTT program involved professional actors from NTC portraying bees, a bear and an ant in a live in-school comedy. After the theatrical event, each teacher was provided with a supplemental curriculum designed to make science come to life.

The unique combination of the theatrical event, classroom-friendly software, and inspiring, curriculum-based science projects helps to build students’ confidence to ask questions, define problems and design their own solutions.

Students then formed in-school teams, provided with LEGO® Education WeDo 2.0 kits and guided by teacher coaches, explored real-world scientific problems and created posters to illustrate their journey of discovery.

Students also constructed a motorized model of what they learned using LEGO® Education WeDo 2.0 kits. The students then showcased their work in a school expo inviting parents, teachers and the local community to experience their creations and journey.

The National Theatre for Children STEAM program focuses on the importance of innovation and helps to educate the next generation of the importance of STEAM based learning. Of the teachers surveyed, 100 per cent reported that they would like to see Stockland continue to offer NTC programs to their school. According to Chloe Felmingham from Cranbourne East Primary School, “Bee on the Team was an incredibly engaging performance that had kids laughing and actively participating. It was a great way to engage students in the process and begin talking about ways to solve problems.”