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Find Your Own Fossil

Category: kids

Get ready to put on your paleontologist hat, kids! It’s time to dig up some dinosaur bones! 

Your kids can find cherished artifacts right in their own garden. Before the excavation starts, you’ll need to create the fossils. 

With just a few simple craft supplies, you’ll have a range of awesome fossilised creatures ready to scatter and recover.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Make your own Dinosaur Fossils

  • Packet of insects/animals 
  • Petroleum jelly
  • Paintbrush
  • Water
  • Plaster of Paris
  • Mixing bowl
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measuring jug
  • Silicone muffin tray

Here’s how to do it:

Make your own Dinosaur Fossils

1. Mix 1 part plaster with 2 parts water (or as directed on the packaging) in a large mixing bowl and let sit for a few minutes.

Make your own Dinosaur Fossils

2. Use a paintbrush to coat the toy of your choice in petroleum jelly. This will ensure easy removal from the plaster.

3. Pour the plaster into a silicone muffin tray distributing the mixture evenly.

Make your own Dinosaur Fossils

4. Press the toy lightly into the plaster to create an imprint of its outline.

5. Repeat for as many fossils as desired.

6. Leave to set for 12 hours.

Make your own Dinosaur Fossils

7. Carefully remove the toy from the plaster.

Make your own Dinosaur Fossils

8. Bury your new fossils in the garden for the little ones to find and let them enjoy the magic of discovery.

Make your own Dinosaur Fossils

This is the perfect way to indulge your child’s dinosaur fantasies, and helping with the craft will keep them entertained for hours.

If you’re ready to awaken the palaeontologist in your child with this exciting game, pop down to the store, pick up the supplies and get creative. 

After you’re done with the excavation, you can even dust off and keep your fossils to use in future scavenger hunts or display in the play room. 

Be sure to enter our name the T. rex competition and you could win an international trip for you and your family to take part in a Dinosaur dig. Enter now.

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